Task Bag Learning

Today we will be talking about learning with task bags. I worked alongside my Educational Psychologist, Jenn Osberg, and my Consultant, Michelle Michaluk, to create literacy, math, fine motor, and life skills task bags that would meet the needs of my learners. As a primary Student Support Teacher, task bags are part of my regular intervention and we love them because they:

  • are play-based and hands-on
  • cover a variety of curriculum and/or individual outcomes
  • are simple to use and model (if another teacher or Educational Assistant will be implementing them)
  • include high-interest materials
  • promote student engagement
  • can be accomplished quickly (5-10 minutes of practice)
  • can be used with 1-3 students to add social goals, such as sharing and turn-taking
  • are quick interventions that reinforce previously taught outcomes
  • are easy and cost effective to create
  • can be created from “Busy Bag” idea books, simple internet searches, or unused items around the classroom

I have used my task bags with a variety of students, particularly a student who could only say two words when they started in our Kindergarten program. Task bags became an easy way to develop this student’s vocabulary, name recognition knowledge, and keep them engaged. What I like most about these task bags is that after modeling the use of the task bags a few times, they are easy for any other adult to take and use and they fit nicely into any schedule. I use my task bags for intervention times. I have also used them for additional literacy and math practice with Kindergarten students who need additional practice time after our centers. It is quick and easy to pull them for 5-10 minutes and target the specific concept and can be done within their classroom. In the classroom, these task bags could be set up as a center after teacher modeling/explicit instruction. I recommend using task bags with 1-2 students but I have used them with up to 3 learners.

 

I have organized my task bags into two shelves and four categories: 

 

a) early math skills

 

 

b) early literacy skills

 

c) fine motor skills

 

d) life skills  

There are countless other tasks bags that could be made and I hope you find use for them in your own room. Please find the task bag labels and instructions attached: Task Bag Instruction Templates. Happy teaching!

 

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Reading Intervention and Learning to Read

This post highlights some helpful tools to use when teaching students to read and/or practicing during intervention times. This is an awesome website for teaching reading in Kindergarten and beyond is Starfall. I recommend game-based reading programs, as the kids seem to engage more and learn the strategies faster! I now have an entire binder overflowing with resources, games, and tricks that can supplement programs like Fountas and Pinnell. (How many binders will I have after a 35 year career?)

Intervention time and Kindergarten time are easily some of my best moments everyday and the more I work in a school the more I realize that my passion is teaching kids to read. I am enjoying, more than I ever would have guessed, working with young children. I could definitely envision myself as a Kindergarten or Grades 3-6 teacher, if I do not get my preferred SST placement!

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