About Ms. Gorham

Teaching :)

(Photo: Teaching at Glen Elm Elementary School).


Kourtney Gorham

I am a Student Support Teacher in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. I received my Bachelor of Education degree and Certificate of Extended Studies in Inclusive Education from the University of Regina. My long term goal is to become an Educational Psychologist and I start my Masters of Educational Psychology Program at the University of Regina this fall. I have been involved with a wide range of experiences related to teaching: coaching basketball, volunteering with Campus for All, sitting on the Special Olympics Moose Jaw Community Executive, Special Olympics coaching, working at Camp Easter Seal, and much more! These endeavors have been valuable tools for learning about those with varying abilities, differentiating instruction, and supporting inclusive environments. My professional interests include working with students of all abilities, teaching early literacy, and coaching basketball. My hobbies include playing recreational basketball, taking spin classes, and reading.

I would like to thank everyone who has been part of my lifelong journey to becoming and being an educator. “A teacher affects eternity; she can never tell where her influence stops” – Henry Adams. I am thankful for those in my life, especially my family, who support and believe in me to fulfill the important role we call teaching!

Please feel free to leave comments; I look forward to connecting with you!

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Recent Posts

Multisensory Approach to Letter Formation

As per our school’s Learning Improvement Plan (LIP) focusing on student writing growth, I am embedding different modalities of letter formation into our phonics lessons. The students are enjoying a multi-sensory approach to writing: play-dough, chalkboards, whiteboard tables, wiki sticks, letter magnets, wooden pieces, etc. A new favorite is writing our letters with paint brushes in shaving cream. It is a really simple lesson that warrants student engagement.

A typical phonics lesson activity: Lakeshore letter-sound buckets for sorting initial sounds.

Shaving Cream Letters Lesson:

  1. Hold up letter cards and get students to state the letter name, sound, and action.
  2. Students copy the letter, starting at the top, with paint brushes in shaving cream. They form the lowercase and the uppercase for each letter.
  3. Students “erase” their letter with their brushes and repeat the process for the rest of the target letters.

Writing letter ‘v’ in shaving cream.

But What About the Mess?

I find that it is not as messy as it may seem. Each student needs to roll up their sleeves and be reminded not to eat, fling, or touch the shaving cream with their hands. We talk about how it smells good but would not taste good (you may want to note that it is NOT whipped cream). I get students to wipe off any excess shaving cream on the side of their tin (get baking pan tins with higher edges rather than baking sheet tins with lower edges) and then at the end of the lesson we use paper towel to clean the brushes before putting them in water.

Ready for the next letter!

The Benefits

The best part of shaving cream letters is that students do not feel pressure to form their letters perfectly. If they make a mistake, they simply can “erase” and try again! The teacher can observe the letter formation and remind students to hold brushes appropriately and start from the top during the lesson so the practice is meaningful. All students, especially those who dislike pencil-to-paper work, seem to buy-in to the novelty of shaving cream letters. No tears, busy minds at work, and smiling faces… seems like a win to me!

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