Edudemic’s Guide to a Flipped Classroom

If you are interested in flipping your classroom, I recommend reading Edudemic’s Guide to a Flipped Classroom.

Why Flip?

A flipped classroom is one of my long-term goals as an educator. After I am more comfortable with using technology in the classroom, I feel that flipping how learning takes place will be a great way to practice my inclusive beliefs and prepare my learners for an ever-changing, globalized world. Furthermore, “studies have found that students K-12 are assigned an average of three hours of homework a day, but many parents [and educators] question whether the quantity of work matches the quality of learning” (Edudemic Staff, 2015). I do not believe this is a realistic amount for most kids to complete, especially those with learning difficulties. Families lead busy lives and the measure of a sound education should not be quantity. However, I do not believe in swinging the pendulum in the complete opposite direction. My belief is that middle ground between hours of homework and absolutely no homework can be found. I believe that a flipped classroom is a model that allows for balance. Students listen to the instruction online (approx. half an hour) at home and then their work is completed in the classroom, where the teacher can assist and collaboration with peers can take place.

Benefits:

  1. This allows students to learn at their own pace: repeat the lesson if needed, skip/skim parts that they already know, etc.
  2. Questioning time is increased and teachers can support their learners without rushing lessons. Students can bring their concerns to class after some reflection.
  3. Increased collaboration due to in-class work time.
  4. Shy students have a chance to voice their concerns/ask questions in a more private manner.
  5. Environmentally friendly: this allows for an almost paper-free classroom.
  6. Parents can see what their children are learning about at school. No more need for the “what did you learn today?” question.

Disadvantages:

  1. Takes time to collect resources/make videos. The teacher and students all need to have access to technology and understand the tools they are using.
  2. Students may not complete the lecture at home. Student motivation is required.
  3. Teachers still will have to balance their time to help all of their learners. Classroom management cannot be forgotten as in-class work-time must be on-task, focused, and hold some structure.

I believe that these issues are similar as to what is already posing challenges in the traditional method. Therefore, I think this model is worth a try and teachers can make adjustments/problem-solve as needed.

Implementation:

  1. Start by getting comfortable with the technology that will be used. Both students and teachers need to know how to best use the tools.
  2. Start small. Edudemic suggests giving homework that is a YouTube video to watch at home and discussion and questions follow the next day. Consider this your pre-assessment.
  3. Start creating your lessons. I would suggest a half an hour a night but adjust accordingly. Also, take a look at what is out there already, who you can collaborate with, etc.
  4. Create in-class time activities/assessments. I would suggest giving students a voice about what they want to do to demonstrate their knowledge. The nice thing is your videos could stay relatively the same year to year but with a new class, new assignments could happen; every year would look a bit different. Students may engage more if they get to co-construct rubrics. However, if problems arise with students not watching the lectures, Edudemic suggests quizzes at the start.

What other problems do you see with the flipped model? What other benefits? How would you work around those issues? What tools would you use to create your lessons? If students were unmotivated to watch the videos at home, what could you do?

Advertisements

One thought on “Edudemic’s Guide to a Flipped Classroom

  1. I am making this comment to highlight some of the collaboration that occurs because of having a blog/creating a positive #digcit. I received an email from Allison Leveque who has a doctoral class at Fordham University. This class is collecting data on flipped classrooms/learning. She left me a link to her survey research project about flipped learning: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/flippedsurvey. I am taking part in this and if you are interested in flipped learning, i recommend that you also contribute. This will help fellow educators gain a broader perspective about what flipped learning means to others/how it is defined. Thanks for taking the time to help other educators and feel free to peruse my blog and leave some comments!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s