Teaching Acceptance

One of my favorite things about being a Student Support Teacher is bringing awareness to all students about those with varying abilities. I truly believe that presenting kids with facts and personal stories about my work at Camp Easter Seal, Astonished, Best Buddies, or Campus for All is the first step to a more inclusive society. Simply put: kids (and adults, too) cannot be inclusive if they are not accepting. They cannot be accepting if they are not tolerant. They cannot be tolerant if they do not understand. They cannot understand if they are not aware! And I couldn’t be more happy that it is part of my role to bring awareness to students so that one day they can also share an inclusive mindset!  Attached are some resources I have used to help bring awareness to students in Grades 3 to 12 about varying abilities. I urge you to use these inclusive resources (or others) and share your stories with your students!

The first link I adapted into a presentation with personal pictures of my experiences in the world for high school students. I found that many students were using the r-word in a non-malicious way. They had never really been told why it is a terrible word to use and I think this is a truth for many people, including adults. You cannot really blame people unless they are made aware; that was my mission! For the most part, it has worked. I still may hear the r-word from time to time but it is often followed by an “I’m sorry” or “I should have used the word ‘stupid.'” I know that even the more challenging kids were touched by my presentation; you could have heard a pin drop and their mouths were on the floor! To me that is a start and I will continue to work on it, one day at a time. I believe that people cannot “un-know” something; they may be able to ignore it but it will always be in the back of their minds. I urge you to fill your students’ minds with positive thoughts, too!

The second link connects you to the book Ian’s Walk: A Story About Autism that I read to the Grades 3/4 class. I found it helpful for students to complete a multiple intelligences survey about themselves first. That way we could discuss how everyone is a bit different and smart in their own way. We also talked about how we are all unique or a bit weird at times. Students were very responsive to this piece and it was nice to bring awareness at such a young age!

In summary, just go out and do it! It may seem like the road to inclusion is a long hike but take it one step at a time and eventually positive change will occur!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s